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  •         WELCOME
         to our Website




    Shown above are our wonderful parish priests.
    Father Ted Vitale, C.P. Non Resident Associate, and our pastor Rev. Msgr.Patrick K. Hambrough.

    We thank you for visiting our parish website.  We hope the information available on this site is helpful to you.  If you need additional information, please call us at 314.743.8600 someone will be more than happy to assist you.



    If you are interested in becoming Catholic we offer a Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults Program a.k.a RCIA.. If you have been away from the Church and are interested in returning we offer a program called Catholics Returning Home a.k.a. CRH. 

    St. Mark Parish is a Catholic community of faith.  Our desire is to build up the Kingdom of God by sharing our gifts of time, talent and treasure with our own parishioners and with those of the larger community.  We invite everyone to join us in our many liturgical services, outreach ministries and social events.

    To build our Catholic community as One Body in Christ, many of our parishioners – and many others in the area around us – get involved in some of our many parish organizations.  These ministries provide opportunities to experience Christian learning, growth and community-building.  They focus on many areas, including:  Spiritual and Liturgical; Administrative; Christian Formation and Education; Youth; Community/World Outreach and Service; Social Groups; and Sporting Teams. 

    Our Parish Catholic School and Parish School of Religion (PSR) strive to educate our youth and to assist in their faith formation as Catholics. 

    We welcome you to St. Mark’s Parish and we invite you to visit our very active and very, blessed faith- based  community.  We invite you to grow with us in faith and service.
     

  •      PARISH SCHOOL         OF RELIGION 2018


    Please click on Education and Faith Formation above and then on Parish School of Religion to the right. You will then be able to click the links necessary to register for PSR.


     
  •           ST. MARK 
      CATHOLIC  CHURCH


     
    St. Mark Church St. Mark School
    4220 Ripa Ave 4220 Ripa Ave
    St. Louis, MO 63125 St. Louis, MO 63125
    314.743.8600 314.743.8640
    314.743.8618 (fax) 314.743.8690 (fax)





     
  • Mass Times 

    Sunday Masses: Sat. Evening: 5PM
     Sun. Morning: 7AM 9AM 11AM,


    Weeksay Mass is offered at 6:30 AM and 8:00 AM Monday through Friday. Saturday Mass is ofered at 8:00 AM.


    Holy Day Masses:6:30AM, 9AM & 7PM (The Day of)

    We have Adoration after the 8:00 AM Mass until 9:00 PM every Tuesday, 

  • The Sacrament of Reconciliation is available from 3:30-4:30PM on Saturdays or by appointment.  

    Even though our new address is 4220 Ripa Ave, correspondence should be addressed to 4200 Ripa Ave. 
     
  • SAINT OF THE DAY

     

     

    Saints Pontian and Hippolytus

    Saint of the Day for August 13

    (d. 235)

    Saints Pontian and Hippolytus’ Story

    Two men died for the faith after harsh treatment and exhaustion in the mines of Sardinia. One had been pope for five years, the other an antipope for 18. They died reconciled.

    Pontian. Pontian was a Roman who served as pope from 230 to 235. During his reign he held a synod in Alexandria which confirmed the excommunication of the great theologian Origen. Pontian was banished to exile by the Roman emperor in 235, and resigned so that a successor could be elected in Rome. He was sent to the “unhealthy” island of Sardinia, where he died that same year of harsh treatment. With him was Hippolytus with whom he was reconciled. The bodies of both were brought back to Rome and buried as martyrs with solemn rites.

    Hippolytus. As a priest in Rome, Hippolytus—the name means “a horse turned loose”—was at first “holier than the Church.” He censured the pope for not coming down hard enough on a certain heresy—calling him a tool in the hands of one Callistus, a deacon—and coming close to advocating the opposite heresy himself. When Callistus was elected pope, Hippolytus accused him of being too lenient with penitents, and had himself elected antipope by a group of followers. He felt that the Church must be composed of pure souls uncompromisingly separated from the world: Hippolytus evidently thought that his group fitted the description. He remained in schism through the reigns of three popes. In 235, he also was banished to the island of Sardinia. Shortly before or after this event, he was reconciled to the Church, and died in exile with Pope Pontian.

    Hippolytus was a rigorist, a vehement and intransigent man for whom even orthodox doctrine and practice were not purified enough. He is, nevertheless, the most important theologian and prolific religious writer before the age of Constantine. His writings are the fullest source of our knowledge of the Roman liturgy and the structure of the Church in the second and third centuries. His works include many Scripture commentaries, polemics against heresies, and a history of the world. A marble statue dating from the third century, representing the saint sitting in a chair, was found in 1551. On one side is inscribed his table for computing the date of Easter; on the other, a list of how the system works out until the year 224. Pope John XXIII installed the statue in the Vatican library.


    Reflection

    Hippolytus was a strong defender of orthodoxy, and admitted his excesses by his humble reconciliation. He was not a formal heretic, but an overzealous disciplinarian. What he could not learn in his prime as a reformer and purist, he learned in the pain and desolation of imprisonment. It was a fitting symbolic event that Pope Pontian shared his martyrdom.