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    Shown above are our wonderful parish priests.
    Father Ted Vitale, C.P. Non Resident Associaste, our pastor Rev. Msgr.Patrick K. Hambrough and Rev. Msgr. Charles J. Forst, Retired, in Residence.

    We thank you for visiting our parish website.  We hope the information available on this site is helpful to you.  If you need additional information, please call us at 314.743.8600 someone will be more than happy to assist you.

    If you are interested in becoming Catholic we offer a Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults Program a.k.a RCIA.. If you have been away from the Church and are interested in returning we offer a program called Catholics Returning Home a.k.a. CRH. 

    St. Mark Parish is a Catholic community of faith.  Our desire is to build up the Kingdom of God by sharing our gifts of time, talent and treasure with our own parishioners and with those of the larger community.  We invite everyone to join us in our many liturgical services, outreach ministries and social events.

    To build our Catholic community as One Body in Christ, many of our parishioners – and many others in the area around us – get involved in some of our many parish organizations.  These ministries provide opportunities to experience Christian learning, growth and community-building.  They focus on many areas, including:  Spiritual and Liturgical; Administrative; Christian Formation and Education; Youth; Community/World Outreach and Service; Social Groups; and Sporting Teams. 

    Our Parish Catholic School and Parish School of Religion (PSR) strive to educate our youth and to assist in their faith formation as Catholics. 

    We welcome you to St. Mark’s Parish and we invite you to visit our very active and very, blessed faith- based  community.  We invite you to grow with us in faith and service.

  • St. Mark Catholic Church

    St. Mark Church St. Mark School
    8300 Morganford Rd 4220 Ripa Ave
    St. Louis, MO 63123 St. Louis, MO 63125
    314.743.8600 314.743.8640
    314.743.8618 (fax) 314.743.8690 (fax)

  • Mass Times

    Sunday Masses: Sat. Evening: 5PM Sun. Morning: 7AM 8:30AM, 10AM, & 11:30AM

    Weekday Masses: Mon.-Fri. 6:30 AM & 8:15 AM  and Sat. 8:15 AM
    *During the School Year 8:15 Mass is at the School Chapel

    Holy Day Masses: 7PM (The Evening Before) 6:30AM, 7:30AM 9AM & 7PM (The Day of)


  • Sacrament of Reconciliation

    The Sacrament of Reconciliation is available from 3:30-4:30PM on Saturdays or by appointment.  
  • Adult Faith

    Parishioners have the opportunity to enrich their life and that of the parish through programs or small faith communities. Contact Jane Brown, opa at 314-743-8604.

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    November 17
    St. Elizabeth of Hungary


    In her short life Elizabeth manifested such great love for the poor and suffering that she has become the patroness of Catholic charities and of the Secular Franciscan Order. The daughter of the King of Hungary, Elizabeth chose a life of penance and asceticism when a life of leisure and luxury could easily have been hers. This choice endeared her in the hearts of the common people throughout Europe.

    At the age of 14 Elizabeth was married to Louis of Thuringia (a German principality), whom she deeply loved; she bore three children. Under the spiritual direction of a Franciscan friar, she led a life of prayer, sacrifice and service to the poor and sick. Seeking to become one with the poor, she wore simple clothing. Daily she would take bread to hundreds of the poorest in the land, who came to her gate.

    After six years of marriage, her husband died in the Crusades, and Elizabeth was grief-stricken. Her husband’s family looked upon her as squandering the royal purse, and mistreated her, finally throwing her out of the palace. The return of her husband’s allies from the Crusades resulted in her being reinstated, since her son was legal heir to the throne.

    In 1228, Elizabeth joined the Secular Franciscan Order, spending the remaining few years of her life caring for the poor in a hospital which she founded in honor of St. Francis. Elizabeth’s health declined, and she died before her 24th birthday in 1231. Her great popularity resulted in her canonization four years later.