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  • WELCOME




    Shown above are our wonderful parish priests.
    Father Ted Vitale, C.P. Non Resident Associaste, our pastor Rev. Msgr.Patrick K. Hambrough and Rev. Msgr. Charles J. Forst, Retired, in Residence.

    We thank you for visiting our parish website.  We hope the information available on this site is helpful to you.  If you need additional information, please call us at 314.743.8600 someone will be more than happy to assist you.



    If you are interested in becoming Catholic we offer a Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults Program a.k.a RCIA.. If you have been away from the Church and are interested in returning we offer a program called Catholics Returning Home a.k.a. CRH. 

    St. Mark Parish is a Catholic community of faith.  Our desire is to build up the Kingdom of God by sharing our gifts of time, talent and treasure with our own parishioners and with those of the larger community.  We invite everyone to join us in our many liturgical services, outreach ministries and social events.

    To build our Catholic community as One Body in Christ, many of our parishioners – and many others in the area around us – get involved in some of our many parish organizations.  These ministries provide opportunities to experience Christian learning, growth and community-building.  They focus on many areas, including:  Spiritual and Liturgical; Administrative; Christian Formation and Education; Youth; Community/World Outreach and Service; Social Groups; and Sporting Teams. 

    Our Parish Catholic School and Parish School of Religion (PSR) strive to educate our youth and to assist in their faith formation as Catholics. 

    We welcome you to St. Mark’s Parish and we invite you to visit our very active and very, blessed faith- based  community.  We invite you to grow with us in faith and service.

  • St. Mark Catholic Church

    St. Mark Church St. Mark School
    8300 Morganford Rd 4220 Ripa Ave
    St. Louis, MO 63123 St. Louis, MO 63125
    314.743.8600 314.743.8640
    314.743.8618 (fax) 314.743.8690 (fax)






  • Mass Times

    Sunday Masses: Sat. Evening: 5PM
     Sun. Morning: 7AM 9AM 11AM,

    Weekday Masses: Monday thru Friday  6:30 AM & 8:15 AM  and Sat. 8:15 AM.
    *During the School Year 8:15 Mass on Friday is at the School. All other masses are at the church


    Holy Day Masses:6:30AM, 9AM & 7PM (The Day of)

     

  • The Sacrament of Reconciliation is available from 3:30-4:30PM on Saturdays or by appointment.  
     
  • Our New APP

    Many parishioners have expressed their appreciation for our new APP. It contains just about everything you may want to know about our parish including the daily mass readings and our bulletin. Check it out. If you have not downloaded the APP yet just text APP to 88202 and follow the prompts.

  • Saint Crescentia Hoess

    Saint of the Day for April 6

    (October 20, 1682 – April 5, 1744)

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    Saint Crescentia Hoess’ Story

    Crescentia was born in 1682, the daughter of a poor weaver, in a little town near Augsburg. She spent play time praying in the parish church, assisted those even poorer than herself and had so mastered the truths of her religion that she was permitted to make her first Holy Communion at the t

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    SAINT OF THE DAY

    Saint Anselm

    Saint of the Day for April 21

    (1033 – April 21, 1109)

    Saint Anselm’s Story

    Indifferent toward religion as a young man, Anselm became one of the Church’s greatest theologians and leaders. He received the title “Father of Scholasticism” for his attempt to analyze and illumine the truths of faith through the aid of reason.

    At 15, Anselm wanted to enter a monastery, but was refused acceptance because of his father’s opposition. Twelve years later, after careless disinterest in religion and years of worldly living, he finally fulfilled his desire to be a monk. He entered the monastery of Bec in Normandy, was elected prior three years later, and 15 years later, was unanimously chosen abbot.

     

    Considered an original and independent thinker, Anselm was admired for his patience, gentleness, and teaching skill. Under his leadership, the Abbey of Bec became a monastic school, influential in philosophical and theological studies.

    During these years, at the community’s request, Anselm began publishing his theological works, comparable to those of Saint Augustine. His best-known work is the book Cur Deus Homo (“Why God Became Man”).

    Against his will, Anselm was appointed archbishop of Canterbury in 1093, at age 60. His appointment was opposed at first by England’s King William Rufus and later accepted. Rufus persistently refused to cooperate with efforts to reform the Church.

    Anselm finally went into voluntary exile until Rufus died in 1100. He was then recalled to England by Rufus’ brother and successor, Henry I. Disagreeing fearlessly with Henry over the king’s insistence on investing England’s bishops, Anselm spent another three years in exile in Rome.

    His care and concern extended to the very poorest people. Opposing the slave trade, Anselm obtained from the national council at Westminster the passage of a resolution prohibiting the sale of human beings.


    Reflection

    Like every true follower of Christ, Anselm had to carry his cross, especially in the form of opposition and conflict with those in political control. Though personally a mild and gentle man and a lover of peace, he would not back off from conflict and persecution when principles were at stake.